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Philips Use Emotional Sensing for Prototype Garments

Posted on May 21, 2007
Wearable Technology 2015-2025
Philips Design has developed a series of dynamic garments as part of the ongoing SKIN exploration research into the area known as 'emotional sensing'. The garments, which are intended for demonstration purposes only, demonstrate how electronics can be incorporated into fabrics and garments in order to express the emotions and personality of the wearer.
 
The marvelously intricate wearable prototypes include the Bubelle - Blush Dress which comprises two layers, the inner layer of which is equipped with sensors that respond to changes in the wearer's emotions and projects them onto the outer textile. The body suit Frisson has LEDs that illuminate according to the wearer's state of excitement. Both measure skin signals and change light emission through biometric sensing technology.
 
Source: Philips Design
The 'Bubelle' - the 'blushing dress' - behaves differently depending on who is wearing it, and therefore exhibits completely nonlinear behavior.
 
"We chose fashion as an idiom to express the kind of research we were doing," says Lucy McRae, Body Architect at Philips Design. "We did this because apparel and textiles can be augmented by a lot of new functionality. A garment can be a highly complex interactive electronic or biochemical device. We are experimenting with devices that are more responsive to subtle triggers like sensuality, affection and sensation."
 
Printed and Flexible Sensors 2015-2025
According to Clive van Heerden, Senior Director of design-led innovation at Philips Design, the SKIN probe has a much wider context than just garments. "As our media becomes progressively more virtual, it is quite possible in long term future that we will no longer have objects like DVD players, or music contained on disks, or books that are actually printed. An opportunity is therefore emerging for us to completely rethink our interaction with products and content."
 
SKIN belongs to the ongoing, far-future research program carried out at Philips Design. The aim of this program is to identify emerging trends and likely societal shifts and then carry out 'probes' that explore whether there is potential for Philips in some of the more promising areas.
 
Further information on Philips Design is available at: www.design.philips.com External Link.

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