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Printed Electronics World
Posted on February 28, 2014 by  & 

New high mobility SWCNT ink technology from National Research Council

Researchers at the National Research Council (NRC) in Canada are developing new materials and processes for printable electronics applications as part of a 5 year research effort working collaboratively with industrial partners (http://www.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/eng/solutions/collaborative/pe_index.html). Among the materials being developed are conductive and semi-conductive inks for thin film transistors, printed antennas, organic photovoltaic, transparent conductive electrodes, printable sensors and other building blocks for printed circuits. These novel materials are being adopted into applications relevant to smart packaging, advanced manufacturing, display and touch screen manufacturing, disposable medical devices, and related industrial fields.
 
Recent progress by the materials research team led by Dr. Patrick R. L. Malenfant, leveraging more than 10-year prior expertise in SWCNTs developed within NRC's Security and Disruptive Technologies portfolio, was presented at PE USA in Santa Clara highlighting breakthroughs in printable semiconducting inks. Dr. Malenfant's team has developed processes and IP to produce semiconducting SWCNT attaining purities exceeding the current commercial benchmark by orders of magnitude. They have been able to fabricate thin film transistors with mobility values exceeding 100 cm2/(Vsec) and 105 current on/off ratios using solution based processing.
 
 
A recent publication in the RSC journal Nanoscale, presents a detailed study on SC-SWCNT enrichment using conjugated polymer extraction. The effect of various parameters on enrichment yield and purity are presented with new insights on the mechanism of enrichment. Thin film transistors performance data using SiO2 as the dielectric are also presented (http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2014/nr/c3nr05511f#!divAbstract). "Our patent pending materials combinations for thin film transistors look very promising and we are eager to implement the package into printed circuits" says Dr. Malenfant.
 
The technology has been licensed by Raymor NanoIntegris (http://www.nanointegris.com/) who will soon be commercially supplying the high purity semiconducting SWCNT ink.
 
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