Hosted by IDTechEx
Printed Electronics World
Posted on April 28, 2016 by Raghu Das & 

IDTechEx Printed Electronics Europe 2016 Award Winners

At the 12th IDTechEx Printed Electronics Europe conference and exhibition, four companies were awarded for their great achievement in developing and commercializing printed electronics technologies. The awards were presented to the four winning companies by Mr Stéphane Egret, R&D Packaging Innovator at The Coca-Cola Company, who was also one of the judges of the awards. The two other judges were Dr Cristina Bertoni, Project Leader, Electrolux Italia and Ashutosh Tomar, Principal Engineer, Technology Strategy, at Jaguar Land Rover.
 
Raghu Das, CEO of IDTechEx, the host of the event, reports "Our esteemed judges are all from companies that are potential users of the technology. This adds great gravitas to the winners and an indication of the ongoing move to adoption of the technology in different industries. There were over 40 entries for the awards this year - a record number."
 
The awards were hosted at Printed Electronics Europe 2016, Europe's largest event on the topic, which was host to over 170 exhibitors and attendees from 57 countries in Berlin. A summary of the awards and winners are as follows:
 
 
Best Technical Development Materials Award - BASF
Best Technical Development Manufacturing Award - BotFactory, Inc.
Academic R&D Award - NSF Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing, Northeastern University
Best Product Development Award - Cartamundi, Holst Centre, IMEC
 
The awards were given to the winners by Mr Stéphane Egret, R&D Packaging Innovator from The Coca-Cola Company.
 
Best Technical Development Materials Award - BASF
 
BASF was the recipient of this award for their development of high performance semiconducting inks and photo patternable dielectrics. The company has developed a set of organic semiconducting (OSC) and dielectric inks that take several needs into account: mobility as key performance parameter of the semiconductor inks is reaching 4 cm2 /Vs, while the dielectric ink is exactly matched to the semiconductor ink (does not dissolve the OSC) and allows for direct photopatterning. Therefore, it helps to enable a simplification of the production process. While comparable mobilities are known from small‐molecule inks, BASF managed to achieve the results using polymeric OSCs which are easier to process and adjustable to a wide variety of coating and printing processes.

Best Technical Development Materials Award - BASF

 
BASF was the recipient of this award for their development of high performance semiconducting inks and photo patternable dielectrics. The company has developed a set of organic semiconducting (OSC) and dielectric inks that take several needs into account: mobility as key performance parameter of the semiconductor inks is reaching 4 cm2 /Vs, while the dielectric ink is exactly matched to the semiconductor ink (does not dissolve the OSC) and allows for direct photopatterning. Therefore, it helps to enable a simplification of the production process. While comparable mobilities are known from small‐molecule inks, BASF managed to achieve the results using polymeric OSCs which are easier to process and adjustable to a wide variety of coating and printing processes.

Best Technical Development Manufacturing Award - BotFactory, Inc.

 
BotFactory has created a product that integrates all of the steps of PCB fabrication into a compact, intuitive package. When BotFactory started on this path in 2013, they took advantage of the maturation in conductive nanoparticle inks, image recognition technology and the drop in costs in control system costs. Called the BotFactory Squink, this Desktop PCB Printer can print conductive traces, dispense solder and pick-and-place components, creating PCBs on anything from paper to FR4 to flexible kapton. According to BotFactory, Squink delivers a solution at several magnitudes of cost lower than in-line manufacturing equipment, heralding one of the rare moments where the rules of manufacturing and innovation are up-ended by miniaturization.
 
 
One of the judges commented on the reason why they chose this company, "Because of its wide array of use and potential value to a number of very valuable consumer targets (engineers, students, makers...)."

Academic R&D Award - NSF Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing, Northeastern University

 
The NSF Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (CHN) won this award for developing what they claim to be the world's first nanoscale 3D printer for electronics and sensors, the Nanoscale Offset Printing System (NanoOPS). The printing process works through the use of new nanoscale directed assembly of nanomaterials for the printing of nano and microscale devices and structures which have applications in electronics, sensors, biomedical, energy and materials.
 
At the heart of the printer is a directed assembly based printing process utilizing templates that can print conductive, semiconducting or insulating organic or inorganic materials. The organization reports that NanoOPS is orders of magnitude faster and higher resolution than current inkjet based electronic printing and 3D printing. The printing process takes place at room temperature and pressure, and the ink can include variety of nanomaterials (nanoparticles, nanotubes, graphene or polymers) suspended mostly in water, thus offering a substantial energy saving and a green additive manufacturing approach.
The next IDTechEx Printed Electronics awards will be held in Silicon Valley in Santa Clara, CA on November 16-17. For more details see www.PrintedElectronicsUSA.com

Best Product Development Award - Cartamundi, Holst Centre, IMEC

 
Cartamundi's ambition is to embed wireless RFID tags in their game and trading cards products. The new technology will connect traditional game play with electronic devices like smartphones and tablets. For economic reasons this will only be feasible when the device and integration cost of the RFID tag is significantly lower than the price increase the market is willing to pay for additional functionalities. The company reports that, "With traditional silicon based RFID technology, it's hard to imagine putting RFID inlays into each and every card in a standard playing-card deck, which typically contains 52 cards. Fortunately, an advanced alternative technology for ultra-low-cost RFID inlays is available: (printed) metal-oxide (IGZO) thin-film transistor (TFT) technology on thin plastic films."
 
 
Metal oxide technology on plastic allows for cost reduction, ultra-thin form factor and flexibility, according to the entry. This technology is can be very thin, matching well with paper thin game cards. With technical help of IMEC and Holst Centre, Cartamundi is currently making first all-out attempts to bring this printed electronics product to the market.
 
One judge selected this winner because, "Games are known to be a good way to scale up a new technology and accelerate adoption. With scale will come lower costs which will enable further scaling."

About IDTechEx

IDTechEx guides your strategic business decisions through its Research and Events services, helping you profit from emerging technologies. IDTechEx Events provide an analytical, commercial outlook, taking into account market requirements, competitive technologies and development roadmaps. Attendees are presented with the full, diverse range of technologies but the main thrust is always on end user needs and commercialization strategies. For more information see www.IDTechEx.com.
 
Learn more at the next leading event on the topic: Printed Electronics USA 2019 External Link on 20 - 21 Nov 2019 at Santa Clara Convention Center, CA, USA hosted by IDTechEx.

Authored By: Raghu Das

CEO

Posted on: April 28, 2016

More IDTechEx Journals